Why the Recorder Curriculum Works

The ultimate measure of any recorder curriculum is the success of the students.  As a young teacher, Ed Sueta believed that there had to be a better and more effective way to teach his students.  Ed has dedicated his life to creating curriculums which sequentially present materials to young students in a way that ensures their success. 

Students must simultaneously process information and translate the information they are processing into physical action.  The demands of this process can make learning the recorder and other musical instruments a challenge.  Ed’s curriculums address this challenge by sequentially and systematically introducing, applying and reinforcing new notes, concepts and rhythms in a way that facilitates learning and encourages retention.

Ed is fond of saying, “I didn’t write the books.  My students wrote the books.”  He spent thousands of hours in class and with private students determining whether the materials he had created worked in practice.  Something could be good in theory but if it didn’t work with his students, Ed wouldn’t use it. 

There is one more element to the underlying philosophy of Ed’s curriculum materials.  “If you are not having fun, you are not doing it right.”  Music should be a source of joy.  That does not mean that developing musicianship is without challenges or that it does not require hard work.  Students have to apply themselves and make a strong effort if they wish to succeed.  However, the journey should be an enjoyable one and students should have fun as they learn.  Ed has created his curriculums in a way that motivate and engage students.  This effort is particularly apparent in the new online, interactive version of Be A Recorder Star.